Graduate School

 Two T S U Students walking together with books in hand

Graduate School

The decision to pursue a graduate degree is one that is not made lightly. It can mean a commitment of several years during which many sacrifices have to be made. Graduate school is a job; those that continue to work while doing graduate studies should expect to balance the equivalent of two full-time jobs. We hope this information will help make the process a little bit easier.

Graduate or Professional School Prep
If you are considering graduate school, researching the continuation of your education may feel like an overwhelming task. If you are not sure how to get started or what you need to consider, check out the information and resources provided on this page

General Information

  • Texas Southern University Graduate School
  • Gradschools.com
  • Petersons Guide to Graduate Schools and Programs
  • GraduateGuide.com
  • The Student Doctor Network
  • EssayEdge.com
  • The Princeton Review
  • CollegeConfidential.com

 

Law School

  • Association of American Law Schools
  • State Bar of Texas

 

Medical School

  • Association of American Medical Colleges
  • AMA – American Medical Association
  • Texas Medical Association
  • Princeton Review
  • FutureDoctor.net
  • MedFools.com
  • Resume Miners.com – Medical School Admissions Essay
  • TomorrowsDoctors.org
  • Accepted.com – Medical School Admissions

 

Dental School

  • American Dental Association
  • Texas Dental Association

 

Pharmacy School

  • American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy
  • American Pharmacists Association
  • Texas Pharmacy Association

 

How to Apply
Texas Southern University Graduate School

Things you will need

  • Application forms
  • Test scores
  • Official, sealed transcripts
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Personal statement
  • Résumé/Vitae

Grad School Resources for more information

Admission Exams
Depending on what program you will be pursuing in graduate school, you will need to take one of the following entrance exams. To learn more about how to prepare for and register to take the appropriate exam for admission into the grad school of your choice, click on one of the following links:

 

Letters of Recommendation

Who should write your letters?
Professors and employers who have intimate knowledge of your work and study habits.

How to select your letter writers

  • Do they know you well enough to write about you in a detailed and persuasive manner?
  • Will they say wonderful things about you?
  • Are they reliable enough to write and post your recommendation letters in a timely manner?

Things to take with you when requesting a Letter of Recommendation

  • Your transcript.
  • A paper or lab showing your best work.
  • A résumé – should include activities and leadership positions.
  • Copies of correspondence with targeted graduate programs.
  • Copy of the latest draft of your statement of purpose.
  • List of other professors who will serve as a reference.
  • All stamps, envelopes, and forms your professor might need, all filled out and ready to go.

Follow-Up

  • Check in with your professor to see if the letter is done. Be nice about it, but don’t fall off the radar screen.
  • Be sure to give each professor a warm and sincere thank-you card once the letter has been submitted on your behalf.

Personal Statements
Here are some do’s and don’t to help write your personal statement.
Do:

  • Unite your essay with a theme or thesis.
  • Choose what you want to discuss and the order in which to discuss it before you begin writing.
  • Write about what interests and excites you.
  • Start your essay with an attention-grabbing lead – an anecdote, quote, question, or engaging description of a scene.
  • Use concrete examples from your life to support your theme.
  • End your essay with a conclusion that refers back to the leading paragraph.
  • Revise your essay at least 3 times.
  • Ask someone to critique your statement of purpose.
  • Proofread the statement by reading it aloud or having someone read it to you.
  • Write clearly, concisely.

 

Don’t

  • Don’t include information that doesn’t support your thesis.
  • Don’t start your essay with “I was born in…” or “My parents came from…”
  • Don’t write an autobiography.
  • Don’t try to be a clown, use gentle humor.
  • Don’t be afraid to start over if it just isn’t working.
  • Don’t try to impress your reader with your vocabulary.
  • Don’t rely exclusively on your computer to check your spelling.
  • Don’t provide a collection of generic statements and platitudes.
  • Don’t give weak excuses for your GPA or test scores.
  • Don’t make up things!
×
Did you know that the “Office of Student Services” is located on the second floor of the Recreation Center? Visit Us Today!

 Click here for information on Scholarships and requirements

 Click here to open Drug and Alcohol Education Services

 Click here to open Vote Texas, Register to Vote